Trump’s tweets hurt his support in the Heartland

trump-tweets

Image courtesy of Vocativ.

My aunt’s glittering Christmas tree remained up and surrounded by presents well past New Year’s. Outdoors, Trump-Pence campaign signs posted around her rolling rural Missouri community did, too – for much the same reason.

“It’s too cold to do anything,” one of my cousins said. “Door froze shut on the car yesterday.”

Across America’s Heartland, one southward bending jet steam after another pulled down bitter cold from Canada since the week after Thanksgiving. Feels-like temperatures had minus signs in front of them, turning county and backroads into strips of ice and freezing my family’s travel plans to my aunt’s house.

Before that, stretching to Election Day, dripping skies turned the rich, dark soil to mud around this mid-Missouri farming landscape, literally and figuratively freezing it in place since Nov. 8.

But when the thaw comes, I wonder if the Trump signs are pulled down before the Christmas decorations.

The hint that they might came during a TV news break between playoff football games. My aunt, whose prayers for clear roads and a big family Christmas were answered, was picking up bits of wrapping paper left after a 90-minute cacophony of gift-giving and food consumption in her broad living room. Recovery victims slouched in every chair and nook between them. About half the sets of eyes aimed at the TV were half open.

Then the news announcer reminded viewers of Donald Trump’s pointed and petty Twitter exchange with Arnold Schwarzenegger two days earlier. A low grunt oozed out on either side of me from a couple of people I knew to be Trump supporters.

“God, I wish he would just shut the hell up,” one of them muttered at the screen.

My ears tingled. The rest of the audience remained quiet. The news announcer was in mid-sentence when some smaller members of our brood returned from playing upstairs. So, later, as the mutterer and I were in the corner of the kitchen nudging second helpings of pecan pie onto fresh paper plates, I leaned in to whisper an inquiry.

“So, eh, not happy with Trump?” I ventured delicately.

This violated protocol on this side of my family, which keeps its ties to one another closer than to politics. In a house brimming with contrasting and conflicting viewpoints on virtually every topic, conversations hew eagerly to health and happiness, weekday labor and weekend relaxation, the severe weather and the cheerful coos from the newest great-grandchild experiencing her first Christmas. Political discussions remain stored with the lawn chairs awaiting the warm-weather days when they can drift harmlessly on sultry breezes.

The mutterer, another of my cousins, applied two dollops of whipped cream to his slice of pie and also whispered.

“Yeah, well, yeah. It’s just … you know …”

He paused.

“I mean, he keeps saying all this stuff that doesn’t really matter and makes him look silly.”

“Hmm.”

“Stuff that makes it look like he’s not paying attention or doesn’t want to.”

“You mean, on Twitter? That Schwarzenegger thing?”

“Yeah. That stuff doesn’t matter to anybody.”

It is safe to say my relatives around here know what does. They work on farms and at schools, in construction and manufacturing. They have watched generations of prosperity devolve into desperation. They see jobs continue to disappear and livelihoods diminish, and they know the reasons are multiple, varied, and complex. When my aunt hosts Christmas, they know it is not just a celebration of togetherness, but also her valiant effort to ward off the same creeping desperation, if only for a few hours.

When my family went to cast their ballots Nov. 8, they did it for the sake of change – the sake of their community – not for a celebrity.

“So many people I know are out there looking for work. Still looking,” my cousin said. “(Trump) says he’s bringing back jobs. Man, I am hoping.”

“But it won’t happen right away,” I said. “It’ll take time. You know that, right?”

“Yeah,” said my cousin, extending the syllable and staring down at the whipped cream. “Yeah, it will. And I’d like to hear him say what he’s got in mind to do it. But … this.” He glanced back at the television, which was showing the kickoff for the second game. “This is what he talks about.”

“You think maybe the news should ignore it?”

My cousin sighed. “Nah, nah, that’s not it. They’re going to say things. Everyone will believe what they believe. I think it’s him being on Twitter all the time complaining about things that don’t matter to anyone.”

He moved to leave. I touched his elbow to stop him. “So, you still going to give him a chance?”

He shrugged. “Got no choice. He’s ours now.”

“But if you thought he might keep tweeting like this, would you have supported him?”

Another shrug. “Man, I don’t know. Maybe. I really didn’t like that Hillary Clinton – didn’t like her one bit. But all this tweeting … man … makes me wonder why I voted for anyone at all …”

An arm attached to one of the grandchildren, then the rest of the grandchild, squeezed between us for the pie. My cousin and I ended the discussion and worked through the growing kitchen crowd back to our places in the living room. We settled back into the joy of the occasion. (Trump used Twitter again two days later to slam another star, Meryl Streep, who criticized him at the Golden Globe Awards.)

Later, as everyone said their farewells and packed to leave, I commiserated.

“My best to your friends,” I told my cousin. “I really do hope for their sake that Trump delivers.”

“Thanks, man,” he said and patted my shoulder. “But I think this is all we’re going to get from him.”

Resolve in 2016 to stop texting while driving

Distracted Driving

I drive 18 miles of interstate each weekday before sunrise. Ahead of me, lines of fast-moving tail lights stretch into the dark toward the horizon, toward my destination, like glowing breadcrumbs aligned along a well-worn trail.

As I draw near to a set of those tail lights, I glimpse something else: the soft white glow from phone screens as people text or read while they drive. I see even more of them after dusk on the commute home, because traffic is heavier and slower at that time.

The least distracted among these drivers announce their divided attention by veering into other lanes and almost into other cars, or they drive 10-15 mph below the limit amid high-speed traffic with two wheels in another lane the whole time. Those drivers who fail to correct often wind up in a wreck surrounded by emergency vehicles on the roadside.

I see an average of one wreck per day along my short stretch of Interstate 64 in eastern Missouri. Usually, more than one vehicle is involved.

According to the National Safety Council, more than one-quarter of all car crashes result from smartphone use. But that percentage represents confirmed numbers. By my count, 60 percent to 70 percent of the people I can see in the other cars along my 36-mile round-trip commute have their faces angled down at their phones instead of up at the road, so I believe the NSC’s estimate is soft.

What happens when drivers stop looking at the road, even for what they think is only a moment? A study by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute found that sending or receiving a text requires an average of 5 seconds – the time it takes to drive the length of a football field at 55 mph.

The overall distance is longer when you consider that few of us on the interstates keep the speedometer at 55.

I admit to being one of those distracted drivers until a few years ago when, along the same stretch of I-64 on a cloudless day, an SUV bounced off the concrete divider and careered across all four lanes into my driver’s side door, totaling my car. (My phone was in my pocket at the time.)

Neither I nor the other driver were hurt, but he resisted giving me his name, address, driver license number, or insurance information for my own insurance records, saying the crash was not his fault. This sounded odd considering the road was dry, the weather was perfect, and witnesses at the scene said nobody was near his vehicle when he lost control.

So, I said, “Fine.” Then I turned to the police officer who was interviewing us for the accident report and said, “Either you obtain his cell phone records for your investigation, or I’ll find an attorney who will.”

The driver’s insurance company cut a check for all damages within 72 hours.

Few things in life are certain except these: death, taxes, and the risk associated with distracted driving. Dozens of studies going back more than a decade confirm this danger, underline it, and yet so many drivers still ignore it. This is why I drive Interstate 64 with a grip on my steering wheel that could strangle a garden hose, and I watch not just the other cars but other drivers as well.

I know, the pressure to look at our phones while driving is great. Driving is monotonous, boring, so we use smartphones as a cure. On top of that, each of us perceives ourselves to be superhuman in some way – like thinking we handle driving distractions better than everyone else.

But nine people die every day in the United States from distracted driving, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the chief cause is smartphone use. Resolve to not inflate that statistic in 2016, and repeat that resolution – and stick to it – every New Year’s thereafter.

‘It’s up to us to stop this’ : The shooting behind my backyard gate

Park Avenue Shooting Memorial

The memorial for two fatal shooting victims that grew to embrace a light pole on Park Avenue near downtown St. Louis started with a couple of teddy bears and a few flowers. (Photo courtesy of Robert Cohen, St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

Bright, multicolored balloons twist and bob around a concrete light pole about 20 yards from my backyard gate. People of all ages took photos of the balloons even as children tied more onto the pole.

In the adjoining community park, a couple hundred people talked, laughed, cried and held each other during a memorial vigil Tuesday as they recalled what happened a few feet from that light pole 24 hours earlier.

A bullet-riddled Nissan carrying two adults and a 9-year-old girl had rolled to a halt with one of the adults already dead and another dying. The girl was wounded but would survive. Their ride ended after a 12-block shootout with the occupants of another car who authorities say were targeting the couple.

I had heard the yelling from bystanders outside my second-floor window before realizing what was wrong. I saw the car go by, followed briefly by four people sprinting after it on foot. By the time I made it downstairs and out the door to investigate, a handful of wailing, distraught people were already reaching into the car to pull out the victims.

Police arrived mere seconds later. A detective at the scene told me they were receiving 911 calls about the shooting before the car had reached a full stop. Once they turned the corner, they only had to follow the sounds of the wailing.

More people rushed to the scene on foot at almost the same rate as the police, who drove in aboard 17 patrol cars and immediately closed the street in both directions. Officers cordoned off a wide area that extended all the way to my gate hinges.

The police anticipated trouble. When large numbers of African Americans are involved, they assume as much and show up en masse. Ferguson – 12 miles northwest of here – is to blame for that. The victims in the car were African American. The detective said the suspects likely were African American, and the growing crowd was upset and almost exclusively African American.

But the tension that was anticipated never materialized, because there was no rage, only outrage and frustration. The police were there like the rest of the crowd, trying to understand what brought two young lives to such a violent end on a tree-lined residential street, probably at the hands of someone equally as young.

One officer bent down on one knee just outside the loop of yellow police tape to talk with a group of boys, none of whom appeared older than seven. All of them, including the officer, had the same stunned looks on their faces, because at what age does one truly understand how anything like this can happen?

To the other side of me, a woman walked past holding her head in her hands and saying to nobody in particular, “I’m never letting my girl out of the house now.”

Then screams pealed out from several of the 70 or so people watching across the street in the park. They just learned the other adult in the car had died at the hospital.

At that, the crowd started to dissipate, with the strong and resolute assisting the inconsolable. The armada of patrol cars dwindled to 12, to eight, to two. The car that held the victims was the last to go, on the back of a flatbed tow truck, beneath the pale glow of that now-landmark street light, the only odd thing at that point being the sight of a single officer standing in the road watching the cargo being loaded.

For me, the hardest part was seeing the pain in the faces of those who either knew the victims or knew that this kind of internecine violence was not about to end. They were worried for their children and their friends and family, and said as much out loud, over and over. The police would be no help; the solution had to come from within.

And so the vigil formed around 5 p.m. Tuesday and lasted well after sundown. About 200 people showed up. They brought flowers and balloons, and a couple brought barbecue kettles. Posters of the dead were pasted to the light pole. The wrap of balloons reached 12 feet in height. And yet, police passed by only infrequently because for this second gathering the people themselves were doing the policing – directing traffic and trying to keep order. I spoke briefly to a few of the people trickling in and out; they replied in broken voices about taking back their lives.

“It’s up to us to stop this. It’s up to us to stop this,” one woman muttered.

Another woman who looked as if dressed for church touched my arm gently and said, “Please, be careful.”

We should all follow that advice.

SPJ salutes its best student journalists with MOE awards

Society of Professional Journalists logoFor the third consecutive year, I served as a judge for the Society of Professional Journalists‘ annual Mark of Excellence awards — honors that recognize the best print, broadcast, and digital journalism at large and small colleges and universities around the country.

The honors are handed out regionally each spring. This past weekend, the awards for my region, Region 7, were handed out during the annual regional conference, hosted this year by Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, Kansas.

Region 7 comprises Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska.

Little else inspires me as much as the students who win these awards and the faculty who nurture the students’ interests and endeavors. The collective display of drive and determination, and the quality of the work, assure me more than anything that journalism is far from dead, and in fact has a bright future.

This year, Kansas University, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and Baker University had the most MOE recipients. Kansas came away with a total of 14 awards and Nebraska-Lincoln received 11 among large schools submitting entries. Baker University, a private, Methodist-affiliated institution in northeast Kansas, led the small-school category with 14 awards. Certificates were given to the winners and finalists during a banquet at the conference.

The first-place finisher in each category qualifies for a national MOE competition that includes all 12 of SPJ regions. The national winners will be notified later this spring and receive recognition at SPJ’s 2014 Excellence in Journalism convention in Nashville, Tennessee, Sept. 4-6.

The awards for each region are determined by a team of SPJ judges who each have at least three years’ worth of professional journalism experience. Directors are discouraged from judging their own regions.

Not all categories receive awards. If judges determine that none of the entries rose to the level of excellence, no award is given.

Large- and small-school divisions are based on total graduate and undergraduate enrollment. Each of the large schools has more than 10,000 students; each of the small schools has fewer. Some awards incorporated both divisions. Listed below are the Region 7 winners and finalists in each category. The spellings and titles reflect those that were submitted in the award-entry process.

 

NEWSPAPERS

Breaking News Reporting (Large)

Winner: “Explosions Shake Students” by Katelynn McCollough, Iowa State Daily, Iowa State University

Finalist: “Police Arrest Suspect in U.S. Bank Robbery” by Emily Donovan, University Daily Kansan, The Daily Collegian, University of Kansas

Finalist: “University Distances Itself from Journalism Professor’s Controversial Tweet” by Emily Donovan, University Daily Kansan, University of Kansas

 

General News Reporting (Large)

Winner: “Mental Health Issues on the Rise Among College Students” by Jakki Thompson, The Collegian, Kansas State University

Finalist: “Health Insurance on Campus” by Leah Wankum, Muleskinner, University of Central Missouri

Finalist: “UNO Makes History as First U.S. University to Trend on Twitter in India” by Sean Robinson, The Gateway, University of Nebraska at Omaha

 

General News Reporting (Small)

Winner: “Domino Effect” by Kavahn Mansouri and Spencer Gleason, The Montage, St. Louis Community College-Meramec

Finalist: “CU CARES for Students” by Amanda Brandt, Creightonian, Creighton University

Finalist: “BU Enrollment” by Jenna Stanbrough, The Baker Orange, Baker University

 

In-Depth Reporting (Large)

Winner: “Human Trafficking Series” by Danielle Ferguson, Iowa State Daily, Iowa State University

Finalist: “$1,163,237: Bookstore Director Admits to Stealing for 10 Years” by Megan Gates, The Standard, Missouri State University

Finalist: “Where Does the Student Activity Fee Go?” by Kristin Gallagher, Muleskinner, University of Central Missouri

 

Feature Writing (Large)

Winner: “Kirkwood Father Tries To Find Meaning in Daughter’s Death” by Allison Pohle, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, University of Missouri-Columbia

Finalist: “Can My Boyfriend Rape Me?” by Bailey McGrath, Iowa State Daily, Iowa State University

Finalist: “We’re the Working Poor” by Jourdyn Kaarre, Lincoln Journal Star, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

Feature Writing (Small)

Winner: “Living the Life He’s Always Wanted” by Steffi Lee, The Simpsonian, Simpson College

Finalist: “Carrying the Weight” by Lauren Bechard, The Baker Orange, Baker University

Finalist: “Sarah Harris at the Boston Marathon” by Jenna Stanbrough, The Baker Orange, Baker University

 

Sports Writing (Large)

Winner: “Welcome to Woody’s World” by Alex Halsted, Iowa State Daily, Iowa State University

Finalist: “Jeff Withey Finds New Friend in @FakeJeffWithey” by Blake Schuster, University Daily Kansan, University of Kansas

Finalist: “Ukulele-Strumming Faifili Plays Different Tune as KU LB” by Mike Vernon, Topeka Capital-Journal, University of Kansas

 

Sports Writing (Small)

Winner: “Former BU Punter Puts Best Foot Forward” by Lauren Bechard, The Baker Orange, Baker University

Finalist: “Purdum Reflects on Extension with Jets” by Chris Duderstadt, The Baker Orange, Baker University

 

Editorial Writing

Winner: Editorial Board, The Campus Ledger, Johnson County Community College

Finalist: Sarah Hayes and Devese Ursery, The Florissant Valley Forum, St. Louis Community College-Florissant Valley

Finalist: Evan Holland, Creightonian, Creighton University

 

General Column Writing (Small)

Winner: Taylor Shuck, The Baker Orange, Baker University

 

Sports Column Writing

Winner: Mike Vernon, The University Daily Kansan, University of Kansas

Finalist: Josh Sellmeyer, The Journal, Webster University

 

Best All-Around Daily Student Newspaper

Winner: Iowa State Daily, Iowa State University

Finalist: The University Daily Kansan, University of Kansas

 

Best All-Around Non Daily Student Newspaper

Winner: Muleskinner, University of Central Missouri

Finalist: The Standard, Missouri State University

Finalist: The Montage, St. Louis Community College-Meramec

 

MAGAZINES

Non-Fiction Magazine Article

Winner: “Field Notes From Missouri” by the staff of Vox Magazine, University of Missouri School of Journalism

Finalist: “Dennis Dailey: A Decade Later” by Laken Rapier, Jayhawker Magazine, University of Kansas

Finalist: “When Liberty Goes Sour” by Abigail Eisenberg, Vox Magazine, University of Missouri School of Journalism

 

Best Student Magazine

Winner: DUH Magazine, Drake University

Finalist: Drake Magazine, Drake University

Finalist: OneWorld Magazine, St. Louis University

 

ART/GRAPHICS

Breaking News Photography (Large)

Winner: “Coach Rhoads’ Reaction to Referee’s Call” by Kelby Wingert, Iowa State Daily, Iowa State University

Finalist: “President Obama” by George Mullinix, University Daily Kansan, University of Kansas

Finalist: “Take Back the Night” by Suhaib Tawil, Iowa State Daily, Iowa State University

 

General News Photography (Large)

Winner: “ROTC Training During Spring 2013” by Suhaib Tawil, Iowa State Daily, Iowa State University

Finalist: “Bacon Fest” by Kelby Wingert, Iowa State Daily, Iowa State University

 

General News Photography (Small)

Winner: “Intoxicated Olympics” by Chad Phillips, The Baker Orange, Baker University

 

Feature Photography (Large)

Winner: “Harrisburg Football Photo Essay” by Kevin Cook and Elizabeth Pierson, Vox Magazine, University of Missouri School of Journalism

Finalist: “Step Show Draws a Big Crowd” by Andrew Mather, Muleskinner, University of Central Missouri

Finalist: “Not Quite Ready” by Steph Anderson Chambers, The Standard, Missouri State University

 

Feature Photography (Small)

Winner: “Jazz Concert” by Chad Phillips, The Baker Orange, Baker University

Finalist: “Man With One Leg Rides Bicycle 150 Miles in Two Days” by Liz Spencer, The Chart, Missouri Southern State University

Finalist: “Downtown Farmers’ Market” by Liz Spencer, The Chart, Missouri Southern State University

 

Sports Photography (Large)

Winner: “My Ball!” by Steph Anderson Chambers, The Standard, Missouri State University

Finalist: “One Last Lap” by Steph Anderson Chambers, The Standard, Missouri State University

Finalist: “Pick Party” by Romain Polge, The Legacy, Lindenwood University

 

Sports Photography (Small)

Winner: “Women’s Soccer Playoff” by Tera Lyons, The Baker Orange, Baker University

Finalist: “Women’s Soccer” by Chad Phillips, The Baker Orange, Baker University

Finalist: “Winning a Point” by Chad Phillips, The Baker Orange, Baker University

 

RADIO

Feature Reporting

Winner: “‘War of the Worlds’ in Context” by Kalen Stockton, KJHK 90.7 FM, University of Kansas

Finalist: “Max Brooks: Zombies, Vampires and Cultural Anxieties” by Chrissie Noriega, KJHK 90.7 FM, University of Kansas

Finalist: “A Little Help From My Friends” by Kassi Nelson, KRNU FM, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

In-Depth Reporting

Winner: “Backpacks: Tools, Fashion Accessories, Personal Statements” by Justin Wilson, KJHK 90.7 FM, University of Kansas

Finalist: “Vinyl Revival” by Scott Ross, KJHK 90.7 FM, University of Kansas

 

TELEVISION

General News Reporting

Winner: “Unknown Circumstances Surround Lincoln Homeless Man’s Death” by Haley Herzog, NewsNetNebraska, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Finalist: “Charter Bus Problems for JCCC” by Heather Dace and Andrew Tady, JC3 Student Video, Johnson County Community College

Finalist: “Sex Trafficking in Nebraska” by Madalyn Gotschall, Time-Warner Educational Access Channel, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

Feature Reporting

Winner: “Nebraska’s First Male Color Guard Member Lives His Dream” by Jenna Jaynes, Time-Warner Educational Access Channel, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Finalist: “Profile of Andreas Brandenberger” by Heather Dace and Nichole Schafer, JC3 Student Video, Johnson County Community College

Finalist: “Exotic Vet” by Aimee Durham, Mediacom Cable-22, Missouri State University

 

In-Depth Reporting

Winner: “Medical Marijuana in the Ozarks” by Riley Bean, Mediacom Cable-22, Missouri State University

Finalist: “Nebraska Law Enforcement Hit By Colorado’s Legalization of Marijuana” by Haley Herzog, NewsNetNebraska.org, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Finalist: “A Closer Look at the Affordable Care Act” by Brittany Velasco, LUTV, Lindenwood University

 

Sports Reporting

Winner: “Henry Josey: Road to Recovery” by Mihir Bhagat, KOMU-TV, University of Missouri-Columbia

Finalist: “Helias Players Get Second Chance at State and Life” by Jack Wascher, KOMU-TV, University of Missouri-Columbia

Finalist: “Don’t Blame Andrew Baggett” by Mihir Bhagat, KOMU-TV, University of Missouri-Columbia

 

News and Feature Photography

Winner: “Owen/Cox Dance Group Project” by Zoe Allen, Bernie Verhaeghe and Nichole Schafer, JCAV TV, Johnson County Community College

Finalist: “100 Missouri Miles” by Erica Semsch, Mediacom Cable-22, Missouri State University

Finalist: “KC Trends” by Stephen Cook, JC3 Student Video, Johnson County Community College

 

Best All-Around Newscast

Winner: “LCTV News” by the staff of Loras College Television, Loras College

Finalist: “Ozarks News Journal No. 801” by the staff of the Ozarks News Journal and Mediacom Cable-22, Missouri State University

Finalist: “Star City News” by the staff of the Time-Warner Educational Access Channel, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

ONLINE

News Reporting

Winner: “Breaking the Cycle: Meth Addiction in Council Bluffs” by Katie Kuntz, IowaWatch.org, University of Iowa

Finalist: “Lincoln’s Homeless Population Struggles with Cold Temperatures” by Casey Sill, NewsNetNebraska.org, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

Feature Reporting

Winner: “Matters of Faith” by the staff of VoxMagazine.com, University of Missouri School of Journalism

Finalist: “Graffiti: The Art of Expressive Vandalism” by the staff of IowaWatch.org, University of Iowa

Finalist: “A Baker’s Dozen” by Katie Thurbon and Taylor Shuck, The Baker Orange, Baker University

 

In-Depth Reporting

Winner: “Matter of Seconds: Tougher Farm Safety Regulation Hard To Come By In Iowa” by Sarah Hadley, IowaWatch.org, University of Iowa

Finalist: “Former Student Attends Class with Pending Default on Student Debt” by Daniel Bauman, The Journal, Webster University

 

Sports Reporting

Winner: “For Amateur Mixed Martial Artist, a Long Road to Fight” by Maricia Guzman, NewsNetNebraska.org, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Finalist: “Freshman Softball Star Rachel Franck Dedicates Season to Younger Brother” by Sam Masterson and Josh Sellmeyer, The Journal, Webster University

Finalist: “Six Former Wildcats Chase NFL Dreams” by Chris Duderstadt and Brad Barnes, The Baker Orange, Baker University

 

Best Use of Multimedia

Winner: “Little Known Secrets” by the staff of VoxMagazine.com, University of Missouri School of Journalism

Finalist: The Road to the 29th Presidency” by Sara Bell, The Baker Orange, Baker University

Finalist: “Marquis Addison MSSU Basketball Feature” by Samantha Zoltanski and Sydney Marsellis, The Chart Online, Missouri Southern State University

 

Best Affiliated Website

Winner: NewsNetNebraska.org by the staff of NewsNetNebraska, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Finalist: Kansan.com by the staff of the, University Daily Kansan, University of Kansas

Finalist: KJHK.org by Marc Schroeder, Sarah Brennan, Taylor Umbrell and the staff of KJHK 90.7 FM, University of Kansas

 

Best Digital-Only Student Publication

Winner: Vox iPad app by Breanna Dumbacher, Vox iPad, University of Missouri School of Journalism

Finalist: Urbanplainsmag.com by the staff of the Urban Plains, Drake University

Finalist: Think-mag.com by the staff of Think, Drake University

 

SPJ is an 8,000-member professional organization that promotes the free flow of information vital to a well-informed citizenry, works to inspire and educate the next generation of journalists, and protects First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and of the press.